Thursday, 8 January 2009

Lee's bacon available


Whilst lunching at Farm Gate Café today, Lee Christmas mentioned to me that his world-renown bacon would be available there this week and next week only, and his equally well known and loved sausages will be available as of next week till February. After that, the supply will be scarce till he gets the farming side happening and ready to produce his pork products again.

So if you want to get a true taste of Tasmania, get down to Farm Gate and pick up some gorgeous pork product from Lee.
Posted on by Rita
29 comments

29 comments:

Christina said...

Mmmmm. Looking to get away from it all this weekend Rita.
Could be the go I reckon.
Maybe a lazy Sunday.

Anonymous said...

I'm hoping to call in on Monday and pick up some personal supplies and introduce some relatives to a fine cooked breakfast. May end up elsewhere though.
Looking forward to your new web site, hope it all goes well.
Noticed also that there is a link on the Mercury website to your blog. Did you know this?
Maybe Steve will get one of his new year wishes yet.

Have a great 2009 Rita.

Cartouche.

rockoyster said...

I have a feeling Farm Gate is only open Thursday to Sunday, Mr. Cartouche.

Rita said...

Good one Christina. Let's fly the Lee-flag.
Cartouche - I hadn't known about the Mercury link till last month, after I'd been getting a larger number of emails via the Email Rita direct facility, and questioned someone about how they'd found the site. They told me of the link on The Merc online.
BTW - there is also a link to this blog on ninemsn, following them emailing me requesting permission to add it to their site.
RO - we'd better clarify this with Lee. Glad you managed to procure your slice of the bacon too!

rockoyster said...

Ahoy Rita and Mr. cartouche

I gleaned my impression from the black sign board ooutside Farm Gat and confirmed by posts from Lee on Rita's Bite quoted below:

18 August 2008

Just wanted to let you know the farmgate will reopen Saturday 23rd Aug and our hours of operation will be Thursday to Sunday 9am to 4pm from the 28th August onwards. We will resume dinners as summer begins.

2 Novemebr 2008

The Farm Gate will be re-opening for dinner as of Friday 7th November from 6.30pm and from then on Friday and Saturday

Won't it be good when you have just one website!

Lancashire Lad said...

Lee, if your following this can you say if you might add Wessex Saddleback Black Pudding to your menu/small goods repertoire.

Please . . . .

Anonymous said...

Thanks for that Rockoyster, had'nt occurred to me that they operated Thursday to Sunday. You saved my bacon, pardoning the obvious pun.

Cartouche

Anonymous said...

Cartouche,
I know your a man of mystery but if you would like me to save you some of my current batch of bacon I can be contacted at farmgatecafe@bigpond.com and we can work out some way to make an exchange that enables you to remain this man of mystery.
Lee

Anonymous said...

I'd love a batch, but I won't be turning up in a trench coat and a trilby.
I have no problem introducing myself to people I just ask that they then don't go blabbing off about my places. I seek no publicity, it ain't broke, don't fix it. Publicity can be a two edged sword, I certainly can do without the cranks.

Will E- mail you tomorrow and arrange a breakfast and a pick up.

Thanks Lee

Cartouche

Anonymous said...

I understand Cartouche, I eagerly await you pending email.
Lee

sick to death of wankers said...

You are one cool dude cartouche.

Christina said...

Well there goes my plans!
Phil's going fishing Sunday so I won't be down this weekend. {sob!}
There's no way I can cook fish as well as Lee.

the archbishop said...

Could be a little less self-important Brother cartouche.

Anonymous said...

You know Bishop, I have the greatest respect for the clergy. I find them to be educated wise people, and I have sought their wisdom, indeed some are friends.
What or where you find self importance from I have no idea, but I can tell you that the people I know have a more balanced view.
So I will ask you; What is wrong with wanting to provide for your family and stay out of the limelight. If I was full of self importance then surely I would be trying to publicly advertise myself.
Come back with an answer. But do me a favour, either spell it out, or be ignored from here in.

Cartouche

the archbishop said...

I wonder if Hitler burnt cookbooks, Sister Rita?

the archbishop said...

I have honored your request and explained my-self Brother cartouche, but Sister Rita has exercised censorship, for what I imagine, is your benefit. I'm not sure why as I made pains to allay some fears you mentioned, and only dealt with matters of the soul.. Perhaps Sister Rita works on a different line.

Anonymous said...

Well Bish' you win some you lose some. So out of interest, what do you like.
I'm in the business of pleasing people, can't always be done, but I would be interested to hear what you have to say about food, I mean it can't all be bread and wine for you can it.

Cartouche

the archbishop said...

Raised on a small property in Northern New South Wales, it was all about what we could produce Brother cartouche. A prisoner of war from Italy ,on farm duties ,cooked when we were young as our mother had died too early. Fresh ,seasonal food was more an economical necessity than trendy and a love of food and cooking was installed. We were not aware of a culinary statement we just ate what was there. In the seventies, a theological residency in Japan taught me more about freshness and a lot about harmony and I found that food could be an important element in spiritual satisfaction. I'm sorry that Sister Rita censored my last comment as I think you would've understood. Be humble my brother, it's liberating.

Anonymous said...

I'm not sure where to begin, if there is a beginning.
I believe everybody embarks upon some form of culinary journey. My own began with my Grandmother picking food from our victory garden, a large plot planted during the second world war. We would pickle, preserve and bake. The garden had its seasons. My grandfather a war veteran planted and toiled ( even though you could buy in the supermarket).
Trips to the Womens Institute after Sunday school continued, and cooking became the norm. We also kept a few animals. Waste not want not was a mantra.
Professional cooking followed later. Like many, I performed, I jumped, I went for it.
My culinary journey is not yet over, but it is at a point where passing on knowledge to the generation of today is as important as the job itself.
Fresh, simple food is where those lessons begin. Teaching about the balance of flavour is another, and how to combine ingredients to achieve a goal.
But it must also be said, they have to learn how to turn a dollar. Now you may reject this, but it is nevertheless a fact they have to know.
I believe that if you look back far enough, bibles korans, etc. The spiritual satisfaction derived from the fatted lamb and the fire with good talk is the very cornerstone of our civilisation. Food is a conduit that brings us all together in one form or another, probably something that could bring all peoples together. After all, you visit another culture, it is the food you sample, it is a way in which people intergrate into other cultures and find acceptance as they invite people to their table.

As for humble. Well thats for others to judge. Spiritually these days, its all about my family.

Cartouche.

the archbishop said...

Very interesting Brother cartouche, but I feel you're not following the gist. You asked for dialogue and all you are providing is monologue. I commend familial love and have never stated otherwise. Extend the love to all.

Anonymous said...

There can be no dialogue until two people understand eachother. Surely you understand this. Your monologue, my monologue, dissemination, questions ergo, dialogue.

Ubi Fides ibi et lux et roburum.

Cartouche

Alter Boy said...

Cartouche has more than one meaning:

* cartouche, an oblong Egyptian hieroglyphs enclosure
* "Cartouche" was the nickname of Louis Dominique Bourguignon, a criminal of the 18th century
* Cartouche (film), a 1962 French film about Louis Dominique Bourguignon
* "Cartouche", a song Blackmore's Night from their 2003 album Ghost of a Rose
* Cartouche (group), a Eurodance act whose biggest Dance hit from 1990 was "Feel The Groove"
* Cartouche box, a small box used to carry ammunition in the musketry period of warfare
* Cartouche (design), a scrolling frame device
* In engineering, a cartouche drawing means a Title Block. This refers to the square in the bottom right hand corner of a technical, engineering or architectural drawings containing the pertinent information on the plan, the draftsman, title, document version, etc.
* In firearms, a cartouche is an inspector's stamp, typically stamped into a wooden buttstock or a pistol grip.
* In heraldry, an oval-shaped shield, used to display the arms of women as an alternative to the lozenge. It is also often used for the arms of clergy who wish to avoid the military implications of the escutcheon.
* In computer programming, a block of text within a code page which contains metadata about the code, including author, description, and purpose.
* In cartography, a decorative emblem on a globe or map usually with information about the manufacturer of the globe or map.
* In cooking, a round of grease-proof paper that covers the surface of a stew to reduce evaporation or to keep components submerged.

From which one do you take your name Brother Cartouche?

sir grumpy said...

Crikey Rita....

rockoyster said...

Meanwhile back at the Farm Gate Ranch . . . . a new website?

Lancashire Lad said...

Black Pudding Pizzas?

Rita said...

That's funny. I googled Farm Gate Cafe last week, hoping Lee had a site up and running now so I could check his hours of opening, and all I could find were references back to my own blog site!

steve said...

Obviously the archbishop person has a thing for cartouche.
I suggest you might show your hand & explain why you are taking cartouche to task, perhaps then as a reader I can understand more? I think you are in your right to question, but be more direct & not use such ambiguous language.
To the latter, cartouche, I reakon you have risen appropriatley & with dignity, to answer any queries. A lesser person would have snarled defensively

the archbishop said...

May I first say that I am not altar boy, and secondly I have explained myself clearly, it's just that Sister Rita as a friend of cartouches deleted it. It was neither malicious nor hostile. Perhaps it was too close to the bone Brother steve.

Anonymous said...

For all who may be interested. The nickname Cartouche was given to me 20 years or so whilst working in a hotel in London. It refers to the circular concertina of paper or foil that one uses to cover stocks glazes etc. It was during the graveyard shifts that I became known for being the only one bothered to do it. Another incidence involving some tarts (ladies of the night) sealed the name and it followed me for years as the coverer of tarts. I still use a simple Cartouche to this day.

Thanks everybody who has contributed to this post, but I'm moving on to the next.

Cartouche